Event Title

Internet and Community: What Does the Future Hold?

Presenter Information

Panel sponsored by the Royal Society of Arts (RSA) and the Center for Policy on Emerging Technologies (C-PET).

Location

Board Room, Carnegie Institution for Science

Event Website

http://ipsonet.org/web/page/512/sectionid/375/pagelevel/2/interior.asp

Start Date

4-12-2023 11:00 AM

End Date

4-12-2023 12:30 PM

Description

Chair: Nigel Cameron, F.R.S.A., President and CEO, Center for Policy on Emerging Technologies

Erik Fisher
Internet, Community and Assessment
Abstract: The development and widespread adoption and use of information technology has given rise to a variety of social transformations at many levels, spanning local communities to global politics.  The broad social, political and ethical dimensions of information and computing technology—as this panel demonstrates—are often presented in terms of the empowerment of individuals, groups, and communities.  For purposes of assessment, determining the correlated effects of information technology on the formation, reconfiguration, and functioning of communities is hardly a straightforward task. This talk reviews the basic functions of technology assessment in relation to the somewhat problematic idea of community in order to pose some broad questions meant to inform the concrete cases presented in this session.

Michael R. Nelson
The Crowd, the Cloud, and Peer-to-Peer Governance
Abstract: In the early 1990s, the Clinton Administration came into office just as the commercial Internet and the World Wide Web were becoming available to average Americans.  By 1994, the new Administration had launched the first White House Web site and hundreds of departmental and office Web sites.  "Web-enabling" government offices--and government employees--resulted in more responsive and more cost-efficient government services. We are now at another critical junction in the development of information technology and e-government.  Web 2.0 technologies, Cloud computing, and Software as a Service (SaaS) are all manifestations of a profound change in the way computing is done.  The Internet is no longer just a communications network, it has become a platform for computing and data storage.  The Obama campaign took full advantage of Cloud computing to identify, mobilize, and support millions of volunteers and supporters.  Since January, the Obama Administration has been taking steps to use the Cloud to fundamentally transform the way government services are provided and how policy decisions are made. With the Cloud, government agencies can more easily share data with each other and with citizens.  The Cloud can make more computing power and storage more affordable, more reliable, and more flexible, enabling new, more sophisticated and more customized services, which can meet the varied needs of different groups of citizens.  More importantly, by providing a powerful new platform for collaboration, the Cloud will enable bottom-up, peer-to-peer government.  Local governments and small groups of citizens will be able to tap into the best data and the best advice available on topics ranging from crime to environmental problems to education to health care.  If governments can fully realize the potential of Cloud computing, it could redefine the relationship between citizens, state and local governments, and the Federal government--and empower non-governmental groups to tackle more of the problems that today governments are expected to address.

Jules Polonetsky
Personal Information: Intelligence That Will Power the Smart Grid And The Achilles’ Heel That Could Take It Down
Abstract: In October, President Obama announced $3.4 billion in federal grants to help build our nation’s Smart Grid.  The President said that the technology that will make up the Smart Grid will make the nation's power transmission system more efficient, encourage renewable energy sources and give consumers better control over their electricity usage and costs. The potential benefits are clear.  Far less obvious to many is that the smart power grid is also a smart information grid, a system that Cisco’s CEO has predicted will be bigger than the Internet. But while Internet privacy issues are limited to the Web activities of users, the Smart Grid will involve the collection of information about what goes on at people’s homes.  As Commerce Secretary Gary Locke stated this September, “The major benefit provided by the Smart Grid… is also its Achilles’ heel from a privacy viewpoint.” This fall, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) identified several potential data privacy concerns involving Smart Grid technology. They include the threat of identity theft, the possibility of personal behavioral patterns being recorded and real-time surveillance. Clearly, a significant amount of new and intimate consumer data will be available through Smart Grid technology.  There are numerous potential users of the data, including utility companies, smart appliance manufacturers, and third parties that may want the data for further consumer interactions.  Moreover, data that can be collected through smart meters and integrated home networks and appliances has significant value.  For example, Smart Grid systems may incorporate advanced broadband and data flow metering functionality, which can collect information about how much electricity an individual uses, which rooms he or she uses most, when, and how often.  Armed with this data, utility companies will be able to manage load requirements better and create a more efficient electricity distribution system.  In addition, device manufacturers will be able to understand better how their devices are used, allowing them to serve their customers better.  These Smart Grid features, however, raise questions about which entities will have access to individual user data and whether individual devices may be identified or tracked. Potential Smart Grid data users, including utility companies and device manufacturers, must engage in responsible data management practices that build consumer confidence and trust.  Such trust can only be achieved if consumers feel that they are receiving sufficient information about and are in control of how their personal Smart Grid data is used.  Thus, Smart Grid data users must consider carefully how they will protect the integrity, privacy, and security of the Smart Grid data obtained from consumer usage patterns.  In addition, Smart Grid data must be gathered responsibly, securely, and with a measure of transparency and consumer control. Only if consumers have confidence about how their data is used will there be the critical growth in Smart Grid technologies.  An individual consumer must be assured that information about his or her behavioral habits will be used only for the purposes understood and agreed to by that consumer and that it will be protected from improper use.  Without such responsible data management practices, there likely will be consumer resistance to Smart Grid technologies and a loss of consumer trust that could hinder Smart Grid deployment efforts, leading to lower demand for new products and reduced innovation.

Erica Newland
Refocusing the FTC’s Role in Privacy Protection
Abstract: The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has historically taken the lead in protecting consumer privacy. The FTC’s current notice, choice and security regime has brought progress toward corporate compliance on privacy, but seems to have met the limits of its utility: the FTC needs to finally move beyond this limited framework. In this paper, we present a roadmap for future action by the FTC in the consumer privacy space. Now is the time for the Commission to apply a full set of Fair Information Practice principles (FIPs) in pursuit of privacy protection. These principles, as outlined by the Department of Homeland Security in 2008, include:
Transparency
Individual Participation
Purpose Specification
Data Minimization
Use Limitation
Data Quality and Integrity
Security
Accountability and Auditing
Properly understood, FIPs constitute a comprehensive privacy framework that can guide the FTC in the 21st century. Any discussion of consumer privacy – whether in Congress, at the FTC, or within industry – must be grounded by a full set of FIPs. These principles should be reflected in any future legislation, FTC enforcement or self-regulatory efforts.

Jeff LaCagna
Professional Associations and the Social Web: What Does the Future Hold?
Abstract: Associations have been an integral part of the American experiment from its inception.  In this century, professional associations have played important roles in the areas of advocacy, education, publishing and standard setting.  The advent of the Social Web, however, is creating unique challenges for professional associations, as well as intriguing opportunities. On the one hand, social platforms are forcibly reinventing the future of associating in ways that disquiet the leaders of many traditional organizations.  On the other hand, the core beliefs that underpin the development and application of social technologies offer professional associations a new way of thinking about what it takes to create "thrivable" communities of meaning in the 21st century. Fundamentally, professional associations still have an important role to play as institutions of civil society, and a serious responsibility to contribute to rebuilding still-fragmented social capital.  But whether these organizations will enjoy a long-term renaissance will certainly depend on their ability to fully embrace social as a way of being in every aspect of their work in the years ahead.

Import Event to Google Calendar

 
Dec 4th, 11:00 AM Dec 4th, 12:30 PM

Internet and Community: What Does the Future Hold?

Board Room, Carnegie Institution for Science

Chair: Nigel Cameron, F.R.S.A., President and CEO, Center for Policy on Emerging Technologies

Erik Fisher
Internet, Community and Assessment
Abstract: The development and widespread adoption and use of information technology has given rise to a variety of social transformations at many levels, spanning local communities to global politics.  The broad social, political and ethical dimensions of information and computing technology—as this panel demonstrates—are often presented in terms of the empowerment of individuals, groups, and communities.  For purposes of assessment, determining the correlated effects of information technology on the formation, reconfiguration, and functioning of communities is hardly a straightforward task. This talk reviews the basic functions of technology assessment in relation to the somewhat problematic idea of community in order to pose some broad questions meant to inform the concrete cases presented in this session.

Michael R. Nelson
The Crowd, the Cloud, and Peer-to-Peer Governance
Abstract: In the early 1990s, the Clinton Administration came into office just as the commercial Internet and the World Wide Web were becoming available to average Americans.  By 1994, the new Administration had launched the first White House Web site and hundreds of departmental and office Web sites.  "Web-enabling" government offices--and government employees--resulted in more responsive and more cost-efficient government services. We are now at another critical junction in the development of information technology and e-government.  Web 2.0 technologies, Cloud computing, and Software as a Service (SaaS) are all manifestations of a profound change in the way computing is done.  The Internet is no longer just a communications network, it has become a platform for computing and data storage.  The Obama campaign took full advantage of Cloud computing to identify, mobilize, and support millions of volunteers and supporters.  Since January, the Obama Administration has been taking steps to use the Cloud to fundamentally transform the way government services are provided and how policy decisions are made. With the Cloud, government agencies can more easily share data with each other and with citizens.  The Cloud can make more computing power and storage more affordable, more reliable, and more flexible, enabling new, more sophisticated and more customized services, which can meet the varied needs of different groups of citizens.  More importantly, by providing a powerful new platform for collaboration, the Cloud will enable bottom-up, peer-to-peer government.  Local governments and small groups of citizens will be able to tap into the best data and the best advice available on topics ranging from crime to environmental problems to education to health care.  If governments can fully realize the potential of Cloud computing, it could redefine the relationship between citizens, state and local governments, and the Federal government--and empower non-governmental groups to tackle more of the problems that today governments are expected to address.

Jules Polonetsky
Personal Information: Intelligence That Will Power the Smart Grid And The Achilles’ Heel That Could Take It Down
Abstract: In October, President Obama announced $3.4 billion in federal grants to help build our nation’s Smart Grid.  The President said that the technology that will make up the Smart Grid will make the nation's power transmission system more efficient, encourage renewable energy sources and give consumers better control over their electricity usage and costs. The potential benefits are clear.  Far less obvious to many is that the smart power grid is also a smart information grid, a system that Cisco’s CEO has predicted will be bigger than the Internet. But while Internet privacy issues are limited to the Web activities of users, the Smart Grid will involve the collection of information about what goes on at people’s homes.  As Commerce Secretary Gary Locke stated this September, “The major benefit provided by the Smart Grid… is also its Achilles’ heel from a privacy viewpoint.” This fall, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) identified several potential data privacy concerns involving Smart Grid technology. They include the threat of identity theft, the possibility of personal behavioral patterns being recorded and real-time surveillance. Clearly, a significant amount of new and intimate consumer data will be available through Smart Grid technology.  There are numerous potential users of the data, including utility companies, smart appliance manufacturers, and third parties that may want the data for further consumer interactions.  Moreover, data that can be collected through smart meters and integrated home networks and appliances has significant value.  For example, Smart Grid systems may incorporate advanced broadband and data flow metering functionality, which can collect information about how much electricity an individual uses, which rooms he or she uses most, when, and how often.  Armed with this data, utility companies will be able to manage load requirements better and create a more efficient electricity distribution system.  In addition, device manufacturers will be able to understand better how their devices are used, allowing them to serve their customers better.  These Smart Grid features, however, raise questions about which entities will have access to individual user data and whether individual devices may be identified or tracked. Potential Smart Grid data users, including utility companies and device manufacturers, must engage in responsible data management practices that build consumer confidence and trust.  Such trust can only be achieved if consumers feel that they are receiving sufficient information about and are in control of how their personal Smart Grid data is used.  Thus, Smart Grid data users must consider carefully how they will protect the integrity, privacy, and security of the Smart Grid data obtained from consumer usage patterns.  In addition, Smart Grid data must be gathered responsibly, securely, and with a measure of transparency and consumer control. Only if consumers have confidence about how their data is used will there be the critical growth in Smart Grid technologies.  An individual consumer must be assured that information about his or her behavioral habits will be used only for the purposes understood and agreed to by that consumer and that it will be protected from improper use.  Without such responsible data management practices, there likely will be consumer resistance to Smart Grid technologies and a loss of consumer trust that could hinder Smart Grid deployment efforts, leading to lower demand for new products and reduced innovation.

Erica Newland
Refocusing the FTC’s Role in Privacy Protection
Abstract: The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has historically taken the lead in protecting consumer privacy. The FTC’s current notice, choice and security regime has brought progress toward corporate compliance on privacy, but seems to have met the limits of its utility: the FTC needs to finally move beyond this limited framework. In this paper, we present a roadmap for future action by the FTC in the consumer privacy space. Now is the time for the Commission to apply a full set of Fair Information Practice principles (FIPs) in pursuit of privacy protection. These principles, as outlined by the Department of Homeland Security in 2008, include:
Transparency
Individual Participation
Purpose Specification
Data Minimization
Use Limitation
Data Quality and Integrity
Security
Accountability and Auditing
Properly understood, FIPs constitute a comprehensive privacy framework that can guide the FTC in the 21st century. Any discussion of consumer privacy – whether in Congress, at the FTC, or within industry – must be grounded by a full set of FIPs. These principles should be reflected in any future legislation, FTC enforcement or self-regulatory efforts.

Jeff LaCagna
Professional Associations and the Social Web: What Does the Future Hold?
Abstract: Associations have been an integral part of the American experiment from its inception.  In this century, professional associations have played important roles in the areas of advocacy, education, publishing and standard setting.  The advent of the Social Web, however, is creating unique challenges for professional associations, as well as intriguing opportunities. On the one hand, social platforms are forcibly reinventing the future of associating in ways that disquiet the leaders of many traditional organizations.  On the other hand, the core beliefs that underpin the development and application of social technologies offer professional associations a new way of thinking about what it takes to create "thrivable" communities of meaning in the 21st century. Fundamentally, professional associations still have an important role to play as institutions of civil society, and a serious responsibility to contribute to rebuilding still-fragmented social capital.  But whether these organizations will enjoy a long-term renaissance will certainly depend on their ability to fully embrace social as a way of being in every aspect of their work in the years ahead.

http://www.psocommons.org/dupont_summit/2009/schedule/6