Event Title

Evidence Based Policy: A Global Challenge to Medicine in an Era of Mistrust

Location

Mayor Room, Carnegie Institution for Science

Event Website

http://ipsonet.org/web/page/512/sectionid/375/pagelevel/2/interior.asp

Start Date

4-12-2023 10:00 AM

End Date

4-12-2023 11:00 AM

Description

Chair: Arnauld Nicogossian, George Mason University

Arnauld Nicogossian
Communicating the Knowledge
Abstract: Policy decisions should be consistent with knowledge base. Communicating the evidence is one of the most important duty of the academic and practicing professionals. Without  the evidence and candor there cannot be transparency and public trust. Poor communication practices can lead to confusion, helplessness, anger, civil disobedience and political backlash. The example of  vaccination for seasonal and pandemic influenza will be discussed in the context of the bioethics, policy and politics.

Naoru Koizumi
Use of Technology to Design Better Health Policies
Abstract: GIS is becoming increasingly popular in health care research in recent years. Typical GIS-based studies include an analysis such as "hot-spot" analysis that detects clusters of an infectious disease, simulation of a disease spread, or demand & supply analysis that identifies geographical areas with over- / under- utilization of services improving decision making in outcomes.

Jessica Heineman-Pieper
Politics in Health Sciences & Policy
Abstract: The complexity of system dynamics in the health care sector enables greater scope for politics through the collective interplay of unconscious biases, deliberate agendas, and systemic tendencies. In the international context, these dynamics operate at the level of whole world-views and are compounded by power asymmetries that, among other things, have skewed important issues in global public health policy for less powerful countries towards US economic interests rather than the true wellbeing of those countries’ citizens. Public trust as well as domestic and global public health can benefit from both recognizing the operation of power and influence in public health science and policy and also mitigating these forces by reinstating core public health commitments.

Import Event to Google Calendar

 
Dec 4th, 10:00 AM Dec 4th, 11:00 AM

Evidence Based Policy: A Global Challenge to Medicine in an Era of Mistrust

Mayor Room, Carnegie Institution for Science

Chair: Arnauld Nicogossian, George Mason University

Arnauld Nicogossian
Communicating the Knowledge
Abstract: Policy decisions should be consistent with knowledge base. Communicating the evidence is one of the most important duty of the academic and practicing professionals. Without  the evidence and candor there cannot be transparency and public trust. Poor communication practices can lead to confusion, helplessness, anger, civil disobedience and political backlash. The example of  vaccination for seasonal and pandemic influenza will be discussed in the context of the bioethics, policy and politics.

Naoru Koizumi
Use of Technology to Design Better Health Policies
Abstract: GIS is becoming increasingly popular in health care research in recent years. Typical GIS-based studies include an analysis such as "hot-spot" analysis that detects clusters of an infectious disease, simulation of a disease spread, or demand & supply analysis that identifies geographical areas with over- / under- utilization of services improving decision making in outcomes.

Jessica Heineman-Pieper
Politics in Health Sciences & Policy
Abstract: The complexity of system dynamics in the health care sector enables greater scope for politics through the collective interplay of unconscious biases, deliberate agendas, and systemic tendencies. In the international context, these dynamics operate at the level of whole world-views and are compounded by power asymmetries that, among other things, have skewed important issues in global public health policy for less powerful countries towards US economic interests rather than the true wellbeing of those countries’ citizens. Public trust as well as domestic and global public health can benefit from both recognizing the operation of power and influence in public health science and policy and also mitigating these forces by reinstating core public health commitments.

http://www.psocommons.org/dupont_summit/2009/schedule/18