Event Title

Increasing Climate Science Literacy: Policymakers, Earth Scientists, Educators, and Students

Location

Board Room, Carnegie Institution for Science

Event Website

http://ipsonet.org/web/page/512/sectionid/375/pagelevel/2/interior.asp

Start Date

4-12-2023 1:00 PM

End Date

4-12-2023 2:00 PM

Description

Chair: Paul Rich, Policy Studies Organization

Abstract: The American Meteorological Society Policy Program and Education Program have initiatives to inform policy makers, current and future leaders within the Earth science community, undergraduate faculty and students, and pre-college teachers on the latest in climate science. The Policy Program conducts training workshops, forums, and collaborative projects with scientists and policy makers. The Education Program offers college-level courses in climate science for in-service, pre-college teachers and undergraduate students.
Key to the mission of the AMS Policy Program is that, in the broadest sense, society has three proactive policy options for reducing the risks associated with global climate disruption (global warming). We could reduce our greenhouse gas emissions and thereby reduce the amount that climate changes (often called mitigation). We could build our capacity to cope with the climate changes that lie ahead (adaptation). We could deliberately manipulate the Earth system in the hope of counteracting the worst impacts of our emissions—critically, without triggering unintended and unpleasant side-effects (geoengineering). Each of these broad categories (mitigation, adaptation, and geoengineering) encompasses a wide range of more specific policy options and none is mutually exclusive—we could use them together and in a wide range of different combinations.
Members of the AMS Policy Program work to help society confront global climate disruption through four core approaches. First, the program trains current and future leaders of the Earth science community on the U.S. Federal policy process so that they can more effectively engage with decision-makers as they consider policy options for addressing climate change. The second approach is to inform policy makers about the latest advances in climate science in order to help them ground their policy choices in the best available scientific knowledge. Third, the Policy Program initiates and leads collaborative projects involving scientists and policy makers designed to ensure that policy development explores a wide range of policy options for dealing with climate change. The fourth approach is research and analysis to develop and examine policy options for reducing the risks of climate change.
In working to promote scientific literacy among the public, the AMS Education Program has produced a suite of college-level courses that engage in-service teachers and undergraduate students by investigating relevant topics in Earth science. Developed with major support from NASA, DataStreme Earth’s Climate System and AMS Climate Studies place participants in a dynamic learning environment where they investigate Earth’s climate system using the most current, real-world environmental data. This allows the course to keep a strong focus on the science, while still addressing many of the societal impacts that draw the attention of today’s students. In this way, the courses help prepare teachers and students to become responsible, scientifically-literate participants in discussions of climate science and climate change.

Import Event to Google Calendar

 
Dec 4th, 1:00 PM Dec 4th, 2:00 PM

Increasing Climate Science Literacy: Policymakers, Earth Scientists, Educators, and Students

Board Room, Carnegie Institution for Science

Chair: Paul Rich, Policy Studies Organization

Abstract: The American Meteorological Society Policy Program and Education Program have initiatives to inform policy makers, current and future leaders within the Earth science community, undergraduate faculty and students, and pre-college teachers on the latest in climate science. The Policy Program conducts training workshops, forums, and collaborative projects with scientists and policy makers. The Education Program offers college-level courses in climate science for in-service, pre-college teachers and undergraduate students.
Key to the mission of the AMS Policy Program is that, in the broadest sense, society has three proactive policy options for reducing the risks associated with global climate disruption (global warming). We could reduce our greenhouse gas emissions and thereby reduce the amount that climate changes (often called mitigation). We could build our capacity to cope with the climate changes that lie ahead (adaptation). We could deliberately manipulate the Earth system in the hope of counteracting the worst impacts of our emissions—critically, without triggering unintended and unpleasant side-effects (geoengineering). Each of these broad categories (mitigation, adaptation, and geoengineering) encompasses a wide range of more specific policy options and none is mutually exclusive—we could use them together and in a wide range of different combinations.
Members of the AMS Policy Program work to help society confront global climate disruption through four core approaches. First, the program trains current and future leaders of the Earth science community on the U.S. Federal policy process so that they can more effectively engage with decision-makers as they consider policy options for addressing climate change. The second approach is to inform policy makers about the latest advances in climate science in order to help them ground their policy choices in the best available scientific knowledge. Third, the Policy Program initiates and leads collaborative projects involving scientists and policy makers designed to ensure that policy development explores a wide range of policy options for dealing with climate change. The fourth approach is research and analysis to develop and examine policy options for reducing the risks of climate change.
In working to promote scientific literacy among the public, the AMS Education Program has produced a suite of college-level courses that engage in-service teachers and undergraduate students by investigating relevant topics in Earth science. Developed with major support from NASA, DataStreme Earth’s Climate System and AMS Climate Studies place participants in a dynamic learning environment where they investigate Earth’s climate system using the most current, real-world environmental data. This allows the course to keep a strong focus on the science, while still addressing many of the societal impacts that draw the attention of today’s students. In this way, the courses help prepare teachers and students to become responsible, scientifically-literate participants in discussions of climate science and climate change.

http://www.psocommons.org/dupont_summit/2009/schedule/14