Event Title

Information Technology and Reforming Health Care Delivery in America: The Status and Planned Adoption of Electronic Medical Records (EMR)

Location

Board Room, Carnegie Institution for Science

Event Website

http://ipsonet.org/web/page/512/sectionid/375/pagelevel/2/interior.asp

Start Date

4-12-2023 10:00 AM

End Date

4-12-2023 11:00 AM

Description

Chair: Guillermo Izabal, PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP

Elie Geisler, Marshall Maglothin, Albert Rubenstein, and Giuseppe Turchetti
Information Technology and Reforming Health Care Delivery in America: The Status and Planned Adoption of Electronic Medical Records (EMR)
Abstract: The challenges and the issues confronting healthcare delivery are universal in nature. In the United States there is currently a major effort to reform the healthcare system, by transforming the ways in which it is funded, and introducing changes in the basic elements of the structure and processes of the system itself. A key initiative in this effort is the use of information technology to streamline the clinical and administrative processes of care, and to make the system more efficient and productive. In this vein, the Obama administration has heralded the accelerated implementation of a national system of electronic medical records (EMR).
This paper starts with the analysis of the nature of EMR, its recent history and development and the issues related to its adoption and implementation by healthcare delivery organizations. We compare the adoption of EMR in the U.S. and in several European countries, in which the adoption rates of this technology have been consistently higher than in America. We offer some explanations to the gap in these rates.
Next, this paper analyses the promises of benefits from EMR, and the documented benefits from EMR adoption on healthcare delivery, its cost, quality, and availability. We survey the literature and examine the myths and the realities of the contributions of this technology. We proceed to analyze the barriers and facilitators which impinge on the adoption, implementation and adaptation of EMR systems by hospitals, clinicians, medical practices, and the administrative organizations such as insurers, regulators, and firms in the medical instruments and technologies sector. This analysis focuses on a multi-country assessment of the issues involved with EMR adoption and how several countries—including the U.S--- resolved these issues or are still hampered by these challenges. We emphasize the assessment of what has worked, what didn’t and why.
From this analysis we draw key conclusions and derive lessons which may be relevant to the current effort to reform the American health care system and to utilize EMR as a key ingredient in the attempt to make the system more cost-efficient, more accessible, and more affordable. Based on these lessons, we offer some recommendations on how the adoption and utilization of EMR can be a valuable tool in the new administration’s major program to employ information technology in the service of the planned reform of healthcare delivery in America.

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Dec 4th, 10:00 AM Dec 4th, 11:00 AM

Information Technology and Reforming Health Care Delivery in America: The Status and Planned Adoption of Electronic Medical Records (EMR)

Board Room, Carnegie Institution for Science

Chair: Guillermo Izabal, PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP

Elie Geisler, Marshall Maglothin, Albert Rubenstein, and Giuseppe Turchetti
Information Technology and Reforming Health Care Delivery in America: The Status and Planned Adoption of Electronic Medical Records (EMR)
Abstract: The challenges and the issues confronting healthcare delivery are universal in nature. In the United States there is currently a major effort to reform the healthcare system, by transforming the ways in which it is funded, and introducing changes in the basic elements of the structure and processes of the system itself. A key initiative in this effort is the use of information technology to streamline the clinical and administrative processes of care, and to make the system more efficient and productive. In this vein, the Obama administration has heralded the accelerated implementation of a national system of electronic medical records (EMR).
This paper starts with the analysis of the nature of EMR, its recent history and development and the issues related to its adoption and implementation by healthcare delivery organizations. We compare the adoption of EMR in the U.S. and in several European countries, in which the adoption rates of this technology have been consistently higher than in America. We offer some explanations to the gap in these rates.
Next, this paper analyses the promises of benefits from EMR, and the documented benefits from EMR adoption on healthcare delivery, its cost, quality, and availability. We survey the literature and examine the myths and the realities of the contributions of this technology. We proceed to analyze the barriers and facilitators which impinge on the adoption, implementation and adaptation of EMR systems by hospitals, clinicians, medical practices, and the administrative organizations such as insurers, regulators, and firms in the medical instruments and technologies sector. This analysis focuses on a multi-country assessment of the issues involved with EMR adoption and how several countries—including the U.S--- resolved these issues or are still hampered by these challenges. We emphasize the assessment of what has worked, what didn’t and why.
From this analysis we draw key conclusions and derive lessons which may be relevant to the current effort to reform the American health care system and to utilize EMR as a key ingredient in the attempt to make the system more cost-efficient, more accessible, and more affordable. Based on these lessons, we offer some recommendations on how the adoption and utilization of EMR can be a valuable tool in the new administration’s major program to employ information technology in the service of the planned reform of healthcare delivery in America.

http://www.psocommons.org/dupont_summit/2009/schedule/1